New York State Education Department seal THE STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT /
THE UNIVERSITY OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK /
ALBANY, NY 12234

TO:

The Honorable the Members of the Board of Regents

FROM:

Johanna Duncan-Poitier

COMMITTEE:

Higher Education and Professional Practice

TITLE OF ITEM:

Update on Alternative Teacher Preparation Programs

DATE OF SUBMISSION:

October 18, 2004

PROPOSED HANDLING:

Discussion

RATIONALE FOR ITEM:

To provide regular updates on elements of the Regents teaching policy

STRATEGIC GOALS:

Goals 2 and 3

AUTHORIZATION(S):

 


SUMMARY:

        Each year since the Board of Regents approved the offering of alternative teacher preparation (ATP) programs by New York State colleges and universities, the Office of Higher Education has provided a report on the activities and status of those programs.  In response to the request for information by the Board of Regents, the attached report for academic year 2003-2004 reflects specific data about the programs, beginning with the Teaching Fellows Program.  

          During the report year, ATP programs were offered by 12 colleges and universities in New York City through the Teaching Fellows Program and by 6 upstate colleges.  The focus of the programs is the preparation of additional teachers in the high need fields of mathematics, the sciences, and special education.  In 2003-2004, 47 percent of ATP candidates in New York City and 96 percent of upstate candidates were prepared in these 3 fields.  Over 2,800 ATP candidates began teaching in 2003-2004 in New York State. 

          In 2004-2005, the New York City Department of Education (NYC DOE) instituted a city-wide mentoring program for all new teachers, including Teaching Fellows.  During the first year, between 5,500 and 6,000 new teachers will receive mentoring.  There were over 300 prepared mentors in place for Teaching Fellows on the first day of school. 

          Staff in the Office of College and University Evaluation (OCUE) has continued to monitor ATP programs through dedicated on-site visits or as a component of teacher education program accreditation visits.  In addition, during the summer of 2003, staff conducted one-day visits to the introductory components of all 12 New York City Teaching Fellows Program colleges.

Alternative Teacher Preparation in New York State

2003-2004 Annual Report

Alternative teacher preparation (ATP) is a relatively small but important source of teachers for hard-to-staff schools and subject areas in New York State.  By design, ATP programs are partnerships among institutions of higher education (IHEs), local school districts, teachers’ unions, and teacher candidates.  Candidates in these programs must meet all the requirements for initial teaching certificates by the end of their programs. 

This report describes New York State ATP programs as of June 2004.  Part 1 looks at trends from school year 2000-2001, when ATP programs began in New York State, through the end of school year 2003-2004.  Part 2 describes program support and outreach efforts during 2003-2004.  Part 3 provides detailed information about new Fellows entering the New York City Teaching Fellows program in fall 2003. 
 

PART 1

General Program Update

Scope.

             From July 2000 to June 2004, the number of colleges and universities offering ATP programs grew from 3 to 18.  The number of ATP candidates beginning teaching increased from 314 in 2000-2001 to over 2,800 in 2003-2004 (See Table 1.1). Over 92 percent of the new candidates were in the New York City Teaching Fellows program.  Appendix 1 includes the names of IHEs offering these programs in 2003-2004.
 


Table 1.1

ATP Program Growth

Fall 2000 through January 2004

Based on the Number of Candidates Starting to Teach

Academic Year

Cohort

Colleges and Universities Participating Each Year

New ATP Candidates

NYC

Upstate

Total

NYC

Upstate

Total

00-01

00-01

2000  Fall

2001 January

  3

  2

0

0

  3

  2

  314

    71

  0

  0

    385

01-02

01-02

2001 Fall

2002 January

13

  1

2

0

15

  1

1,094

    36

 62

   0

1,192

02-03

2002 Fall

15

3

18

1,829

 82

1,911

03-04

03-04

03-04

2003 Fall

2003 Rolling

2004 January

12

  1

  2

6

0

0

18

  1

  2

2,442

     83

     86

  79

143

    0

2,833

Total new candidates at 12 NYC and 6 upstate colleges/universities

5,955

366

6,321


SOURCES:  NYC DOE (updated data) and upstate colleges, fall 2004.
NOTE: Colleges with Rolling and January cohorts also had fall cohorts.

Focus.

  When ATP programs were first authorized by the Board of Regents, colleges and universities registered a broad range of programs in this format.  Since then, institutions have narrowed the focus to the high-need subject areas.  In New York City in 2003-2004, 47 percent of Teaching Fellows started teaching in the high-need areas of math, the sciences, and special education.  Upstate, 96 percent of ATP candidates were in math, the sciences, and special education programs.  This change in focus represents the responsiveness of these programs in meeting local needs.

Impact.

            Since their inception in 2000-2001, ATP programs have prepared over 6,000 individuals to begin teaching careers.  The New York City Department of Education (NYC DOE) reports that there are 6,000 teachers employed in the City who entered the profession through various cohorts of the Teaching Fellows Program (including the 2004-05 cohort).

Principals throughout the State continue to provide anecdotal reports of their high levels of satisfaction with teachers prepared through ATP programs.  In addition, at the end of each academic year the NYC DOE conducts a survey of principals who employ Teaching Fellows.  The 2003-2004 survey continued to show satisfaction with ATP candidates in affecting gains in student achievement and understanding the subject matter they were teaching.   A research team, with Principal Investigator Professor James Wyckoff, is conducting a longitudinal study of the effectiveness of New York City teachers prepared through a variety of routes.  Reports from the research will be released soon to provide more information about the influence of Teaching Fellows on student achievement; the full report should be released in early 2007.

Oversight. 

          OCUE staff continue to monitor ATP programs through site visits and through e-mail contact.  When a college or university that has ATP programs is scheduled for a teacher accreditation site visit, a review of ATP programs becomes a focused part of the visit.  In cases where an accreditation visit is not scheduled during the academic year, staff make dedicated site visits to ATP programs.   During 2003-2004, 5 dedicated site visits were made, with 1 resulting in an unsatisfactory report.  The institution receiving the unsatisfactory report was required to provide additional information and to make changes in its ATP program prior to accepting a new 2004 cohort.  Frequent e-mail and phone contact is continuing with the program director, and a follow-up visit will be made to this college during early 2005.  Accreditation site visits resulted in 2 satisfactory program reviews.  In addition, during the summer of 2003, staff conducted one-day visits to the introductory components of all 12 college and university partners in the New York City Teaching Fellows Program.  These visits resulted in satisfactory reports.

Teacher retention. 

          To effectively address teacher shortages, ATP programs must prepare teachers who can effect change in their students and who stay in teaching.  The NYC DOE considers a Fellow to be “retained” when the Fellow remains in or completes the Teaching Fellows program and is teaching for the NYC DOE.  The first-year retention rate for the 2003-2004 cohort of Teaching Fellows was 93 percent.  The retention rates over longer periods of time in Table 1.2 are in the same range as other rates reported for New York City and the nation (Lankford, Wyckoff and Papa, 2000; NCES, 2004).  All partners in New York City and upstate ATP programs continue to examine recruitment, selection, placement, graduate programs, and school-based support in order to understand the causes of attrition and to improve retention rates. 

 


Table 1.2

 Retention Rates for New York City Teaching Fellows

Fall 2000 through Fall 2003 Cohorts

 

Cohort

 

Start Pre-Service Training

Jun-00

Jan-01

Jun-01

Jan-02

Jun-02

Jun-03

 

Date School

Started

Sep-00

Feb-01

Sep-01

Feb-02

Sep-02

Sep-03

Totals

Started Teaching Year 1

314

100%

71

100%

1,094

100%

36

100%

  1,829

100%

2,442

100%

5,786

Finished Teaching Year 1

270

86%

66

93%

940

86%

33

92%

1,655

90%

2,259

93%

90%

Started Teaching Year 2

256

82%

60

85%

837

77%

32

89%

1,557

85%

82%

Finished Teaching Year 2

241

77%

55

77%

815

74%

29

81%

1,520

83%

80%

Started Teaching Year 3

209

67%

52

73%

701

64%

28

78%

65%

Finished Teaching Year 3

200

64%

51

72%

674

62%

25

69%

62%

Started Teaching Year 4

Finished Teaching Year 4

168

164

54%

52%

39

36

55%

51%

54%

52%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

4

55%

2

58%

36

67%

1

81%

32

87%

NA

 

 

NOTE:  Data provided by the NYC DOE through payroll actions recorded as of July 2004 payroll.  Data does not include the 2003 Rolling nor the 2004 January cohorts that are included in Table 1.2.
 

  • January cohort benchmarks correspond with beginning and end of school year, not service year, and are not included in totals column percentages.
  • Retention percentages are shown as a percent of those who began teaching in year one.
  • Numbers include all active teachers in good standing as Teaching Fellows, including those on an authorized leave.

PART 2

Continuation of federal grants. 

          Based on annual progress reports submitted to the U.S. Department of Education, the Teacher Quality Enhancement ($464,815) and the Transition to Teaching ($400,000) grants were continued for 2003-2004.  These grants enable us to award funds on a competitive basis to independent institutions working as partners in the New York City Teaching Fellows Program.  We also received $153,592 in supplemental HEA funds.  These funds are being used to support two projects:
  • Through the SUNY Research Foundation, Professor James Wyckoff is conducting an evaluation of 2003-2004 and 2004-2005 Teaching Fellows working in grades 3 through 5. The study will analyze student achievement, cohort retention, college supervision, college coursework, and school-based mentoring, thus contributing greatly to our knowledge of the effects of the Teaching Fellows Program.  Results of this study are expected in the fall of 2006.
     
  • Pace University conducted a pilot of the “Rolling Fellows” approach that prepares additional Teaching Fellows to begin teaching during an academic year. These new teachers are used to provide permanent replacements for teachers who leave during the academic year. The pilot program included candidates in mathematics, bilingual elementary education, the sciences, and English.  Most of the candidates were placed in teaching positions by the end of the fall 2003 semester.  Eighty-three candidates began the program and 75 are still teaching, for a retention rate of 90 percent.

Project Leadership Team (PLT).

          As part of our federal grant projects, we have established a Project Leadership Team (PLT) comprised of representatives from institutions receiving project funds, the NYC DOE, and SED.  In the four meetings held during 2003-2004, the PLT discussed issues and strategies for improving ATP programs, developed an evaluation plan for the two grant programs, and shared best practices, including the assessment of teacher candidates.  On March 5, 2004, the PLT sponsored a statewide meeting of ATP programs that was attended by 60 representatives of IHEs and other interested organizations.  The meeting included presentations on selection and placement of candidates, forming partnerships with PreK-12 schools, and candidate support, as well as roundtable discussions on topics affecting ATP programs.

Outreach

          As an outreach effort, a brochure was prepared in Spanish and English for use at the 17th annual Somos El Futuro Conference in April.  The brochure introduced prospective candidates to ATP programs and included contact information for colleges offering ATP programs.

Innovative new ATP program

.  In December 2003, SUNY Empire State College received approval for their ATP programs to be offered at seven locations throughout New York State beginning in fall 2004.  The College applied for and received an ESEA Transition to Teaching grant totaling $2.4 million to implement their innovative program using technology to support the program and its candidates.

Mentoring update

.  The NYC DOE has budgeted $36 million for 2004-2005 to implement a city-wide mentoring program for all first-year teachers.  Approximately 300 mentors have been trained by the New Teacher Center from the University of California, Santa Cruz.  Representatives from the New Teacher Center will work with New York City’s recently hired Director of New Teacher Induction and Regional Directors of New Teacher Induction to implement the mentoring plan.  Between 5,500 and 6,000 new teachers, including Teaching Fellows, will be mentored this year.  IHE representatives report that most Teaching Fellows began the 2004-2005 academic year with mentors assigned and in place. 

Continuing dialogue

.  Discussions are continuing with the NYC DOE and other partners on how to prepare and use the “second written agreement” that details continued mentoring and ways to meet individual learning needs of ATP candidates following the initial eight weeks of mentored teaching.  Part of this discussion centers on the roles of each of the participants in the joint meetings that are to take place every three months during the first year of mentored teaching as required by Part 52.21(b)(3)(xvii) of the Commissioner’s Regulations.  At this time, partners appear to be seriously working together to fully comply with regulations.

PART 3

Fall 2003 New York City Teaching Fellows 

The New York City Department of Education (NYC DOE) provided the Department with more detailed data on New York City Teaching Fellows (Fellows) who started teaching in fall 2003 than on any previous cohort of Fellows as part of evaluation efforts related to the two federal grants.  The tables in this report are descriptive, but do not imply cause and effect.

Schools with fall 2003 Fellows

.  A total of 2,442 Fellows started teaching in fall 2003, of which 2,430 were assigned to 719 schools and 12 to assignments that were not school-specific.  More than half of the Fellows were in schools in the Bronx and Brooklyn, but Fellows were assigned to every borough (See Table 2.1).

 

Table 2.1

Distribution of Fall 2003 Fellows and Their Schools by Borough

Borough

Number of Fall 2003 Fellows

Number of Schools with Fall 2003 Fellows

Fall 2003 Fellows per School

Average

Maximum

Bronx

936

215

4.35

20

Brooklyn

698

237

2.95

11

Manhattan

417

123

3.39

26

Queens

365

136

2.68

12

Staten Island

14

8

1.75

4

Not school-specific

12

--

--

--

All Boroughs

2,442

719

2.77

26

SOURCE:  NYC DOE September 2004.

NOTE:  “Not school-specific” assignments included assignments in non-public schools and the Teacher Reserve Pool.

Fellows per school

          One in three of the schools with fall 2003 Fellows had only one new Fellow.   Two in three of the schools had less than four fall 2003 Fellows (See Table 2.2).

Table 2.2

Distribution of Schools and Fellows by Number of Fellows per School
 

Number of Fall 2003 Fellows per School

Schools

Fall 2003 Fellows

Number

Percent

Number

Percent

1

249

35

249

10

2

140

19

280

12

3

96

13

288

12

4

58

8

232

10

5

42

6

205

8

6

30

4

186

8

7

32

4

224

9

8

22

3

176

7

9

14

2

126

5

10+

36

5

464

19

Totals

719

100*

2,430

100

SOURCE:  NYC DOE September 2004.

NOTE: This table does not include 12 Fellows with assignments that were not school-specific.


* Percentages may not sum to 100 due to rounding

Performance categories of schools with fall 2003 Fellows

          Sixty percent of fall 2003 Fellows were assigned to schools that were not identified as low-performing schools, 37 percent were assigned to Schools in Need of Improvement (SINI), as defined by federal law, and 5 percent were assigned to Schools Under Registration Review (SURR).  There were 19 schools that were both SURR and SINI schools. These 19 schools had 77 fall 2003 Fellows.  SURR schools with fall 2003 Fellows were 4.6 percent of all schools with fall 2003 Fellows and were in all boroughs except Staten Island.  SINI schools were 31.4 percent of all schools with fall 2003 Fellows and were in all boroughs  (See Tables 2.3 and 2.4).
 


Table 2.3

Distribution of Fellows by School Performance Category
 

Number of fall 2003 Fellows per school

Percent of fall

2003 Fellows

SINI schools

915

37

SURR schools

134

5

Not SURR/SINI schools

1,472

60

SOURCE:  NYC DOE September 2004.

NOTE:  Fellows are double counted in this table and will total more than 2,442.  There were 19 schools that were both SINI and SURR schools. These schools had 77 Fellows. 
 


Table 2.4

Performance Category of Schools with Fall 2003 Fellows by Borough

   

SURR schools1

SINI schools2

Borough

Number
of schools

Number

Percent of schools

Number

Percent of schools

Bronx

215

16

2.2

75

10.4

Brooklyn

237

12

1.7

69

9.6

Manhattan

123

3

0.4

37

5.1

Queens

136

2

0.3

43

6.0

Staten Island

8

0

0.0

2

0.3

 

719

33

4.6

226

31.4

SOURCE:  NYC DOE September 2004 and SED/BEDS.

NOTES

1 SURR denotes Schools Under Registration Review in school year 2002-2003.

2 SINI denotes Schools in Need of Improvement as of 2/26/04.

Age of fall 2003 Fellows.

          Thirty-seven percent of fall 2003 Fellows were age 25 or less, 40 percent were age 26 to 35 years, 11 percent were age 36-45 years, 10 percent were over age 45, and for 2 percent no age information was available.  More than 3 in 4 fall 2003 Fellows were under age 36 (See Table 2.5).
 

Table 2.5

Distribution of Fall 2003 Fellows by Age Range

Age Range

Number of Fellows

Percent of Fellows

25 years or less

905

37

26 to 35 years

966

40

36 to 45 years

275

11

46 years or more

256

10

Age not available

40

2

Totals

2,442

100

SOURCE:  NYC DOE September 2004.

Certification areas.

           Fall 2003 Fellows were enrolled in graduate level teacher education programs in 18 certification areas.  The 5 areas with the most fall 2003 Fellows were Elementary Education with 725 Fellows, Special Education with 609, Math and Math Immersion combined with 399, English with 248 and Social Studies with 146 (See Table 2.6).
 


Table 2.6

Distribution of Fall 2003 Fellows by Certification Area

Certification Area

Number of Fellows

Percent of Fellows

Elementary Education

725

30

Special Education

609

25

Math (Immersion)

339

14

English

248

10

Social Studies

146

6

ESL

67

3

Elementary Education (bilingual)

61

2

Math

60

2

Biology/General Science

53

2

Special Education (bilingual)

30

1

Spanish

28

1

General Science

20

1

Earth Science/General Science

17

1

Chemistry/General Science

14

1

Music

11

0.45

Physics/General Science

6

0.25

Social Studies (bilingual)

6

0.25

Art

1

0.04

Physical Education

1

0.04

Totals

2,442

100

SOURCE:  NYC DOE September 2004.

 

Graduate institutions

.  Fall 2003 Teaching Fellows were in graduate programs at 12 colleges and universities.   Seven of the institutions each enrolled over 100 Fellows, 4 institutions each enrolled between 65 and 100 Fellows, and 1 institution enrolled 30 Fellows  (See Table 2.7).
 


Table 2.7

Distribution of Fall 2003 Fellows by Graduate Institution

Graduate Institution

Number of Fellows

Percent of Fellows

Mercy College

597

24

Brooklyn College

395

16

City College

367

15

Lehman College

205

8

Pace University

198

8

Queens College

194

8

St. John’s University

137

6

Fordham University

98

4

Hunter College

83

3

College of Staten Island

73

3

Long Island University

65

3

Adelphi University

30

1

Totals

2,442

100

Source: NYC DOE September 2004

First-year teacher retention

.  The first-year retention rate varied slightly by borough, by number of new Fellows in a school, and by certification area.  There was no variation by school performance category (See Tables 2.8-2.11).  These variations are correlations, but imply no causation
 


Table 2.8

First Year Retention Rates for Fall 2003 Fellows by Borough

Borough

Number of Fellows

at Start of School

First Year Retention Rate

(Percent)

Brooklyn

698

92

Queens

365

94

Bronx

936

92

Manhattan

417

92

Staten Island

14

86

Not school-specific

12

31

SOURCE:  NYC DOE September 2004.

NOTE:  Fellows are “retained” only if they remain in or complete the NYC DOE Teaching Fellows program and are teaching for the NYC DOE. 

 


Table 2.9

First Year Retention Rates for Fall 2003 Fellows
by Number of New Fellows per School

SCHOOL SETTING

Number of Fall 2003 Fellows Per school

Number of Fellows

at Start of School

in Each School Setting

First Year

Retention Rate

(Percent)

1

249

94

2

280

95

3

288

93

4

232

94

5

205

93

6

186

88

7

224

92

8

176

91

9

126

94

10 or more

464

93

SOURCE:  NYC DOE September 2004.

NOTES:  Fellows are “retained” only if they remain in or complete the NYC DOE Teaching Fellows program and are teaching for the NYC DOE.  Schools with fall 2003 Fellows may also have Fellows from earlier cohorts.


Table 2.10

First Year Retention Rates for Fall 2003 Fellows
by School Performance Category

School performance category

Number of Fellows

at start of school

First year

retention rate (Percent)

SINI school

915

93

SURR school

134

92

Not SURR/SINI school

1,472

92

SOURCE:  NYC DOE September 2004.

NOTE:  Fellows are “retained” only if they remain in or complete the NYC DOE Teaching Fellows program and are teaching for the NYC DOE. 
 


Table 2.11

First Year Retention Rates for Fall 2003 Fellows by Certification Area

Certification Area

Number of Fellows at Start of School

First Year

Retention Rate (Percent)

Elementary Education

Special Education

Math (Immersion)

English

Social Studies

725

609

339

248

146

92

94

92

91

92

ESL

Elementary Education (bilingual)

Math

Biology/General Science

Special Education (bilingual)

67

61

60

53

30

93

98

92

92

100

Spanish

General Science

Earth Science/General Science

Chemistry/General Science

Music

28

20

17

14

11

82

85

88

93

82

Physics/General Science

Social Studies (bilingual)

Art

Physical Education

6

6

1

1

83

83

100

100

SOURCE:  NYC DOE September 2004.

NOTE:  Fellows are “retained” only if they remain in or complete the NYC DOE Teaching Fellows program and are teaching for the NYC DOE. 

 

References and Benchmarks 

National Center for Education Statistics.  Teacher Attrition and Mobility:  Results from the Teacher Follow-up Survey, 2000-01.  E.D. Tabs, NCES-2004-301.  August 2004. 

Table 2, page 9, shows one-year retention rates for U.S. teachers with 1-3 years of teaching experience ranging from 77.4 to 79.7 percent, with retention defined as staying in the same school.  http://nces.ed.gov/surveys/sass/.

 

Lankford, H., Wyckoff, J. and Papa, F.  The Labor Market for Public School Teachers:  A Descriptive Analysis of New York State’s Teacher Workforce.  The University at Albany, October 25, 2000. 

Table 2, page 17, shows a 58.2 percent six-year retention rate for New York City, and 58.9 percent six-year retention rate for New York State for teachers who began teaching in 1991, with retention defined as staying in the same school district.  http://www.albany.edu/edfin/EFRC_pubspage.html.

INSTITUTIONS OFFERING ALTERNATIVE TEACHER PREPARATION

(TRANSITIONAL B) PROGRAMS in 2003-2004

Institution

Location

Certificate Areas

SUC Buffalo

Buffalo

Physics 7-12

SUNY Empire State College

New York City, Buffalo, Rochester, Syracuse, Capital Region

Adolescence Biology, Chemistry, Earth Science, English, French, Spanish, Mathematics, Physics, and Social Studies

CUNY Brooklyn College

 

Brooklyn

Childhood 1-6; English 7-12/5-6 Ext.; Social Studies 7-12/5-6 Ext.; Physical Ed.; Visual Arts; Special Ed. Birth-2; Special Ed. 1-6; Spanish 7-12; Mathematics 7-12/5-6 Ext.; Physics 7-12; Chemistry 7-12; Biology; 5-9; Chemistry 5-9; Earth Science 5-9; Physics 5-9; Mathematics 5-9

CUNY City College

 

Manhattan

Childhood 1-6/Bilingual/Teacher Ext.; Childhood 1-6; English 7-12; ESOL; Mathematics 7-12; Biology 7-12; Chemistry 7-12; Earth Science 7-12; Physics 7-12; Biology 5-9; Chemistry 5-9; Earth Science 5-9; Physics 5-9; Mathematics 5-9; Bilingual/Teacher Ext.

CUNY Staten Island

Staten Island

Childhood 1-6; Special Education/Childhood

CUNY Lehman College

Bronx

English 7-12; Social Studies 7-12; Music; Bilingual/Teacher Ext.; Spanish; Mathematics 7-12

CUNY Hunter College

Manhattan

Childhood 1-6; Special Education 1-6

CUNY Queens College

Flushing<

Childhood 1-6; English; Social Studies; Special Education/Childhood; Music; Spanish; Biology; Chemistry; Earth Science; Physics

Adelphi University

Garden City

Mathematics 7-12

Daemen College

Amherst (partnership with Brooklyn Jewish Community Schools)

Early Childhood Special Education; Childhood Special Education

Fordham University

Bronx, Manhattan

English 7-12; Social Studies 7-12; Special Education/Childhood

Iona College

New Rochelle

Early Childhood Birth-2; Childhood 1-6; English 7-12; Spanish 7-12; Biology 7-12; Mathematics 7-12; Social Studies 7-12

LIU – Brooklyn Campus

Brooklyn

Special Education 1-6; ESOL

Mercy College

Bronx, Dobbs Ferry, Yorktown Heights

Childhood 1-6; Special Education/Childhood; Bilingual

Mount Saint
Mary College

Newburgh

English; Spanish; Biology; Chemistry; Mathematics; Social Studies

Pace University

New York,
Pleasantville

Childhood 1-6; English; Social Studies; Biology; Chemistry; Earth Science; Physics; Mathematics

Roberts Wesleyan College

Rochester

Inclusive Childhood; Special Education/ Middle Childhood Generalist; 7-12 – English, Biology, Chemistry, Physics, Mathematics, Social Studies

St. John’s University

Queens

Childhood 1-6; Special Education/Childhood; Mathematics 5-9

Utica College

Utica

7-12 – French, Spanish, Biology, Chemistry, Earth Science, Physics, Mathematics, Social Studies, English; Technology Education

   

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11/23/04